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Four Virginia legislative races eligible for recount

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At least three Virginia House of Delegates races and one Virginia Senate race could be eligible for a recount, although they would not affect the Democrats maintaining a majority in both chambers of the General Assembly.

A losing candidate is eligible to appeal to the State Board or the electoral board if he or she lost by one percent of the vote or less, according to Virginia law.

Del. Christopher Stolle, R-Virginia Beach, is the only candidate so far who suggested that he will file for a recount, telling the Virginian-Pilot that he believes he would win if there is one. Stolle is just 18 votes shy of his Democratic challenger, Nancy Guy, according to unofficial results. Guy received 10,958 votes in the 83rd House District and Stolle received 10,940 under current counts.

Stolle’s district became much more competitive after a court-ordered redrawing of the maps shifted it from an 11.5 point spread in favor of Republicans to an 8.3 point spread in favor of Democrats.

In House District 27, incumbent Del. Roxann Robinson, R-Chesterfield, leads her challenger Larry Barnett by about six-tenths of a percent, according to the current tallies. Barnett trails Robinson by slightly fewer than 200 votes.

Democratic incumbent Roslyn Tyler, D-Jarratt, is leading the District 75 race by nearly one percent of the vote, according to the current tallies. Her opponent, Otto Wachsmann, is trailing her by slightly more than 500 votes.

In Senate District 7, Republican candidate Jen Kiggans leads her opponent Cheryl Turpin by about eight-tenths of a percent in an open race, according to the current tallies. Turpin trails Kiggans by about 500 votes. Although she could still file for a recount, Turpin conceded the race to Kiggans.

In the elections earlier this week, Democrats flipped both chambers from a Republican majority to a Democratic majority. This is the first time that Democrats controlled the governor’s mansion and both chambers of the General Assembly in about 25 years.